Dog Sled TOURS IN British Columbia: YOUR HUSKY TRIP Near Vancouver

Dog Sledding in British Columbia

The gateway to adventure — British Columbia is a husky adventures haven. British Columbia is a dream come true for those that love the outdoors; from the Pacific coast where you can go wild salmon fishing, to the rugged mountains that are perfect for hiking and skiing, British Columbia has a lot to offer. Along with all of these awesome outdoor adventures, dog sledding is also a popular activity for the area. More about dog sledding in British Columbia

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History of dog sledding in British Columbia

The native people of British Columbia flourished in the area because of the abundance of food and resources, but their relationship with dogs was also important to their success. Dogs were used to pull sleds with freight, for protection from bears, and some tribes even had wooly dogs to use their hair for weaving! Europeans moved into the area for fur trading, exploration, and gold. British Columbia has a rich history of gold rushes; beginning in 1850 and up until the 1940s, there were several famous gold rushes in the region. During the majority of these gold rushes dog sleds were used to deliver mail and supplies in the snowy winter times. Extraordinarily, in order to keep this historical purpose for dog sledding alive, mail can still be delivered by dog sled! An event known as the Gold Rush Trail Dog Sled Mail Run takes place yearly and follows the old mail delivery sled trails. In modern times, dog sledding is now used for racing and tourism more than anything else. Breeders in British Columbia supply for racing teams as well as for resorts and husky tour operators. Many resorts offer packages for dog sled tours along with overnight stays in their guest ranches and lodges.

British Columbia Sled Dog Racing 

There are many associations that promote and organise racing events in British Columbia. The BC Sled Dog Association is the most specialised for the region. Of course the International Federation of Sled Dog Sports and International Sled Dog Racing Association support some racing events in British Columbia as well. Because the amount of snow per year is unpredictable, some racing events are rescheduled or moved to new locations. All in all, there are always some lively and competitive events for fast dogs and good mushers to compete in. 
Cariboo Challenge Sled Dog Races take place in the areas of Cariboo and 100 Mile House, British Columbia. Races are held every year, providing the snow conditions are good. They have 10 dog, 6 dog, 4 dog, and junior level races. There is even have a weight pulling dog sled competition held. The racing courses are designed to be spectator friendly and ideal for racing.
The Caledonia Classic Sled Race is a highly popular and exciting event in Fort St. James, British Columbia. This weekend event of racing has sprint and stage races on awesome trails and over a frozen lake if temperatures are right. The sprints are for 4 dog, 6 dog, or 10 dog teams. The stage race is 150 miles (241 km) and takes place over three days. Teams racing in the stage race consist of 6 - 10 dogs. The total amount of prize money awarded in 2015 was $14,500! Fort St. James Sled Dog Association hosts the event and many sponsors contribute. It is a fun-filled gathering of dog sled fans and enthusiasts. They even offer free dog sled rides to spectators. 

General information about British Columbia

British Columbia is Canada’s third largest province. Vancouver is the largest city and welcomes many tourists passing through to visit the pristine terrain of British Columbia. A charming thing about British Columbia is that one can leave the city and be in the backcountry within a matter of minutes. The province has milder weather due to it’s Pacific coast. There is more rain then snow in the winter, but in the eastern region and higher elevations of British Columbia there is more snowfall. The region is unique for its varying landscape from islands to mountains. Chains of islands stand along the coast of British Columbia; Vancouver Island is the largest and receives thousands of tourists each year for its seaside and mountainous beauty. The impressive mountain ranges that run through British Columbia are the Coast Mountains, Columbia Mountains and the Canadian Rockies. Fairweather Mountain is the highest mountain and sits on the border of British Columbia and Alaska. British Columbia is home to seven national parks, with Glacier National Park and Yoho National Park being among the first in all of Canada. Of these beautiful parks, two are recognized as UNESCO World Heritage Sites: Yoho and Gwaii Haanas National Parks. Within these national parks and gorgeous mountains there are thousands of miles of trails. The real adventure and best way to experience these sights is from a sled being pulled along by a strong dog team. In the area of Whistler there are many resorts that offer dog sledding tours. Kennels that have husky tours are easy to find in British Columbia. Wolfdog and Siberian Huskies are popular breeds in the area. 

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